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THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HOP DISTANCE AND CONTROL IN ACLR PATIENTS

Authors: 

Brendan Marshall, King E, Shane Gore, Holland É, Travers S, Franklyn-Miller A, Kieran Moran, Strike S, Falvey E

Publication Type: 
Refereed Conference Meeting Proceeding
Abstract: 
While anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries account for less than 1% of all injuries in football, there is a significant morbidity associated with them (Ekstrand 2014). Professional footballers, for example, can take approximately 6.5 months before a return to team training following ACL repair (ACLR). In addition, the risk of re-injury is relatively high ranging from 6 to 27% (Shelbourne et al. 2014; Paterno et al. 2010). Following ACLR, rehabilitation specialists test muscular strength, power and movement control to assess rehabilitation progress and to inform return to play (RTP) decision making. Muscular strength is typically assessed using isokinetic testing (Fernandes et al. 2012), while power development can be assessed using a single leg hop for distance (Grindhem et al. 2011). Isokinetic strength and power performance are primary objective markers when assessing readiness to RTP following ACL injury, but the quality of movement control (a more qualitative assesment by the rehabilitator) is often overlooked. This may lead to an over reliance on performance outcome measures when assessing readiness to return to play without proper consideration being given to movement control.
Conference Name: 
XXIV International Conference of Sport Rehabilitation and Traumatology Football Medicine Strategies for Player Care
Proceedings: 
XXIV International Conference of Sport Rehabilitation and Traumatology Football Medicine Strategies for Player Care
Digital Object Identifer (DOI): 
10.NA
Publication Date: 
11/04/2015
Conference Location: 
United Kingdom (excluding Northern Ireland)
Research Group: 
Institution: 
Dublin City University (DCU)
Open access repository: 
Yes